Charles W. “Charlie” Wyckoff
Scholarship Recipients

Congratulations Christian Lusardi
and Jennifer Persichilli

Christian Lusardi who will be attending his final year RIT in anticipation of a 2019 graduation.
” Here is one of my favorite pictures from the past year. I made this in conjunction with my classmate, Scott Semler. I like it because it was a project where we had to build an Arduino controlled water droplet rig that should have worked just fine, but our parts were malfunctioning constantly.

After over 100 attempts and three hours of imaging, Scott and I were able to walk away with this image and I could not be more happy with it.

As for my goals in photography, I would like to continue my education into graduate school to try and become a better programmer in the imaging field. I really want to do more image processing and hopefully join the car automation field. I love photography and the power of cameras as a tool for measurement and data acquisition. ”
His photo is water droplets.

Jennifer Persichilli , a senior at Endicott College
“As a photographer and an individual, I always love to seek things beneath the surface. I am very passionate about exploring through my photography, whether it be new places, or capturing unique people. Beyond these unique moments, I want to capture both the beauty and the flaws of the world around me while I travel, creating art that can also send a message.”
Her Photo is SEA FOG.

It is Photographic Solutions 3rd year working with the New England Camera Club Council and awarding scholarships to qualified students pursuing a degree in photography from an accredited institution.

About the Scholarship

Charles W. “Charlie” Wyckoff (1916 – 1998) was a significant contributor to the field of photography whose inventions went largely unheralded but which we all use and take for granted today. His postgraduate work at MIT with Harold (Doc) Edgerton led to the invention of the electronic strobe. (See Doc’s iconic image of a bullet piercing an apple.)

As a photochemist specializing in high speed photography, Charlie was responsible for the development of high speed film capable of recording for the first time the enormous dynamic range of a nuclear blast, which directly led to the development of the atomic bomb for the Manhattan Project, also with Doc Edgerton.

Charlie was hired by CBS to analyze the famous Zapruder film of the Kennedy assassination. In 1975, with Edgerton and Robert Rines Charlie made headlines while attempting to photograph the Loch Ness monster.

Charlie ran his research company, Applied Sciences, in Needham Heights, MA in the 1970’s and 80’s, where he developed and produced highway reflective strips white were brilliant white – unless you were traveling the wrong way, in which case the lines glowed bright red as a warning. He was an enthusiastic teacher and loved to talk photography with an enthusiasm which was contagious.

Photosol, Inc.
318 Seaboard Ave.
Venice, FL 34285